Repostings and quotations from an aspiring historical theologian. When I find a cool or funny thing to look at, it goes here. An animal doing a thing might also make an appearance from time to time.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from magictransistor  430 notes

magictransistor:

Saint Bede the Venerable, Saint Isidore of Sevilla, Saint Abbo of Fleury. Cosmography, Walters MS W73. 1100s.

Created in 12th century England, this manuscript was intended to be a scientific textbook for monks, designed as a compendium of cosmographical knowledge. The complex diagrams that accompany the texts help to illustrate this knowledge, and include visualizations of the heavens and earth, seasons, winds, tides, and the zodiac, as well as demonstrations of how these things relate to man. Most of the diagrams are rotae, or wheel-shaped schemata, favored throughout the Middle Ages for the presentation of scientific and cosmological ideas. Moreover, the circle, considered the most perfect shape and a symbol of God, was seen as conveying the cyclical nature of time and the Creation as well as the logic, order, and harmony of the created universe.

Reblogged from verycooltrash  272 notes
discardingimages:

Ezekiel’s Vision (Ezekiel 1:1-30) ‘Also out of the midst thereof came the likeness of four living creatures. And this was their appearance; they had the likeness of a man. […] As for the likeness of their faces, they four had the face of a man, and the face of a lion, on the right side: and they four had the face of an ox on the left side; they four also had the face of an eagle. Thus were their faces: and their wings were stretched upward; two wings of every one were joined one to another, and two covered their bodies.’Nicolaus de Lyra super Bibliam, Italy ca. 1402.
Manchester, John Rylands University Library, Latin MS 30, fol. 123v

discardingimages:

Ezekiel’s Vision 

(Ezekiel 1:1-30) ‘Also out of the midst thereof came the likeness of four living creatures. And this was their appearance; they had the likeness of a man. […] As for the likeness of their faces, they four had the face of a man, and the face of a lion, on the right side: and they four had the face of an ox on the left side; they four also had the face of an eagle. Thus were their faces: and their wings were stretched upward; two wings of every one were joined one to another, and two covered their bodies.’

Nicolaus de Lyra super Bibliam, Italy ca. 1402.

Manchester, John Rylands University Library, Latin MS 30, fol. 123v

Reblogged from deutschemark  198 notes
ordocarmelitarum:

Bernini - The Ecstasy of St. Teresa 
" It was our Lord’s will that in this vision I should see the angel in this wise. He was not large, but small of stature, and most beautiful—his face burning, as if he were one of the highest angels, who seem to be all of fire: they must be those whom we call cherubim. Their names they never tell me; but I see very well that there is in heaven so great a difference between one angel and another, and between these and the others, that I cannot explain it. I saw in his hand a long spear of gold, and at the iron’s point there seemed to be a little fire. He appeared to me to be thrusting it at times into my heart, and to pierce my very entrails; when he drew it out, he seemed to draw them out also, and to leave me all on fire with a great love of God. The pain was so great, that it made me moan; and yet so surpassing was the sweetness of this excessive pain, that I could not wish to be rid of it. The soul is satisfied now with nothing less than God. The pain is not bodily, but spiritual; though the body has its share in it, even a large one. It is a caressing of love so sweet which now takes place between the soul and God, that I pray God of His goodness to make him experience it who may think that I am lying." - The Life of Teresa of Jesus

ordocarmelitarum:

Bernini - The Ecstasy of St. Teresa 

" It was our Lord’s will that in this vision I should see the angel in this wise. He was not large, but small of stature, and most beautiful—his face burning, as if he were one of the highest angels, who seem to be all of fire: they must be those whom we call cherubim. Their names they never tell me; but I see very well that there is in heaven so great a difference between one angel and another, and between these and the others, that I cannot explain it. I saw in his hand a long spear of gold, and at the iron’s point there seemed to be a little fire. He appeared to me to be thrusting it at times into my heart, and to pierce my very entrails; when he drew it out, he seemed to draw them out also, and to leave me all on fire with a great love of God. The pain was so great, that it made me moan; and yet so surpassing was the sweetness of this excessive pain, that I could not wish to be rid of it. The soul is satisfied now with nothing less than God. The pain is not bodily, but spiritual; though the body has its share in it, even a large one. It is a caressing of love so sweet which now takes place between the soul and God, that I pray God of His goodness to make him experience it who may think that I am lying." - The Life of Teresa of Jesus

Reblogged from adaltaredei  64 notes
dramoor:

"The Divine Liturgy is truly a heavenly service on earth, in which God Himself, in a particular, immediate and most close manner is present and dwells with men, for He Himself is the invisible celebrant of the service; He is both the Offerer and the Offering.  There is on earth nothing higher, greater, more holy, than the liturgy; nothing more solemn, nothing more life-giving.”
~St. John of Kronstadt
(Photo: dramoor © 2014 St. Basil’s Cathedral, Moscow, Russia)

dramoor:

"The Divine Liturgy is truly a heavenly service on earth, in which God Himself,
in a particular, immediate and most close manner is present and dwells with men,
for He Himself is the invisible celebrant of the service; He is both the Offerer and the Offering. 
There is on earth nothing higher, greater, more holy, than the liturgy; nothing more solemn, nothing more life-giving.”

~St. John of Kronstadt

(Photo: dramoor © 2014 St. Basil’s Cathedral, Moscow, Russia)